The Data Analytics Blog

Our news and views relating to Data Analytics, Big Data, Machine Learning, and the world of Credit.

Thomas Maydon

Thomas Maydon

Thomas Maydon is the Head of Credit Solutions at Principa. With over 13 years of experience in the Southern African, West African and Middle Eastern retail credit markets, Tom has primarily been involved in consulting, analytics, credit bureau and predictive modelling services. He has experience in all aspects of the credit life cycle (in multiple industries) including intelligent prospecting, originations, strategy simulation, affordability analysis, behavioural modelling, pricing analysis, collections processes, and provisions (including Basel II) and profitability calculations.

Recent Posts:

P-Hacking - Are You Guilty Of Data Fishing?

A year ago, I published an article about motivated reasoning and how that can damage the data analytics process. It is part of a blog series on cognitive biases and logical fallacies that data analysts should avoid. Today I’d like to extend this conversation into a topical matter: p-hacking, also known as data fishing.

Mastering The Swiss-Army Knife Of Business Software: The Business Rules Management System

Business Rules Management Systems (BRMS's) are the Swiss-army knives of business software. Despite this, very few companies we work with are getting the most out of their decision engines. In this blog, we explore how BRMSs are used across the customer lifecycle.

Our 2017 Top Blogs: Data Science

Data science continues to be a hot topic in many large firms globally.  2017 saw data science subjects such as R vs. Python, deep learning, natural language, gamification, AI and machine learning being arguably the most topical.

Our Top 2017 Blogs: Credit Risk Solutions

As 2017 draws to a close, we reflect back on the year of credit.  Some of the key themes that featured this year for us included:

Why A Learning Culture Is So Critical In The Workplace

As a company passionate about innovation we are regularly evaluating and re-evaluating knowledge – whether it’s our collective own, an employee’s or a client’s. Knowledge is a funny thing.  Common sense might suggest that the more one learns about a subject the more confident one becomes. However, this is not entirely true, at least not in the beginning. The Dunning-Kruger Effect The Dunning-Kruger effect (DKE) is a cognitive bias that has been known for some time, but was only formalised in 1999 by two Cornell psychologists.  It involves the seemingly contradictory idea that often those with little knowledge on a subject may come across as exceedingly confident about the subject.  Conversely those with more knowledge may be less confident. 

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